Skip to main content

About your Search

20130801
20130831
STATION
FOXNEWSW 156
FBC 136
CNNW 116
MSNBCW 98
FOXNEWS 79
CNBC 65
CNN 65
MSNBC 49
KGO (ABC) 9
KNTV (NBC) 7
WMAR (ABC) 6
KPIX (CBS) 4
WBAL (NBC) 3
WJZ (CBS) 2
WRC (NBC) 2
LANGUAGE
English 797
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 797 (some duplicates have been removed)
for equality and economic progress and issued a challenge to america -- to live up to its democratic ideals. how does america measure up today? i'll ask our guests, civil rights pioneer and georgia congressman john lewis, mayor of newark, new jersey, cory booker, and develop nor of louisiana, bobby jindal. also, we'll explore the overall state of american dream -- civil rightses, the struggle of the middle classes, issues at the heart of our political debate. our roundtable weighs in. host of msnbc's "politics nation," the reverend al sharpton, pulitzer prize-winning journalist sheryl wudunn, republican congressman from idaho, raul labrador, and unique perspective from historian doris kearns goodwin as well as "new york times" columnist david brooks. i'm david gregory. all that ahead on "meet the press" this sunday, august 25th. good sunday morning. thousands of people gathered here in washington saturday to re-create the march on washington where dr. king gave his famous i have a dream speech. and it was exactly 50 years ago today, august 25th, 1963, that dr. king and the executive secreta
in the past 50 years we have witnessed what i'd like to call the nonviolent revolution in america, a revolution of values, a revolution of ideas, and our country is a better country. >> you know, the president will speak on wednesday in the same spot. he'll mark 50 years since the i have a dream speech. we've talked over the years, and you told me about a year and a half ago in your view a lot of people can't get comfortable with the idea of an african-american president even though what a testament to the progress and the dream that dr. king had. and you even said during your speech yesterday there are forces, there are people who want to take us back. what specifically are you talking about? >> well, i hear people over and over again saying we want to take our country back. take it back where? where are we going? we need to go forward. we've made so much progress. i often think -- when i was growing up, i thought it was science that said white men, colored men, white women, colored women, colored waiting, those signs are gone. when i first came to washington in 1961, the same ye
about coming to america. wide spread furry and december stress in distress over this in australia. >> there really has. disbelief, shock. chris was a rising star having the time of his life over in the united states. we've all heard about gun violence in america, but this really brought it home. parents in australia who may have children on scholarships in the u.s. and students themselves, just out of disbelief that could happen to one of ours. this is the front page in melbourne here today, "the herold son." it says the team's american police shot our star. it's senseless and the reaction from the family as well as reporting from that baseball club just north on melbourne here. family, friends and team mates and people from the local baseball club have been down there this week. terribly sad, they are placing a baseball with tributes, flowers on the home base. his mother and father held back tears and described chris as another normal kid. he loved baseball and the game since he was 15 years old and loved it because he wanted to go to college in the u.s., piers, and saw this was
, america has much more nd cheaper natural gas. this means famils pay less to heat their homes. soon america may be self-sufficient in energy. also, if you are worried about global warming, burning natural gas releases less greenhouse gas than oil or coal. >> flack go feels wrong. it feels like you are pumping stuff into mother earth. >> jn: a liberal european environmentalist points out that europe promised to cut greenhouse gas emissions but didn't cut them. >> we managed tout half what you accidentally happened to do when you stumbled on fracking. >> john: so it brings fuel cheape, maybe better for the world. why are these people so mad? >> they worry about energy companies shoving these dangeroushemicals into the ground. >> this is seen sfraen a documentary called gas lane. >> the documentary gas land. >> they gave it director an emmy and matt damon features greedy energy companies destroying the promised land. >> if it happens to one of us, it could happen to us all of us. > john: yoko ono started artists against fracking. and so is the left wing media. >> itomes up by the millions of g
farland, and author of the knewly released book, "the brotherhood: america's next great enemy," thank you, both, for being here. >> thank you. >> thank you. lou: kt, starting with you, the idea that the president wants to reurn, the administration wants to return to a democratically elected president, which is precisely what the egyptian people have demonstrated they want no more of after a year, think you would know more. >> well, those are not the actions anymore. the actions is can the military establish some kind of order because the option is not military againstmocracy. it's the military maybe gets a little bit of order going, or you have chaos and potentially another civil war. i thought, by the way, the introduction was great. you set up the fact that we were for the mubarak government before we were against them, and then we were for the morsi government before we against it, and for the military government before we were against it now. lou: thank you, and the with the -- the "we" referred there is a reference to the obama administration. eric, in the book, you call for a move against
. when women succeed, america succeeds. when people of color succeed, america succeeds. he would also want us to be fighting for voting rights. certainly we must pass a bill in the congress to correct what the supreme court did, but we must also be sure that every person who is eligible to vote can vote and that their vote would be counted. when i was here 50 years ago, people said -- and that includes voting rights for the district of columbia. when i was here 50 years ago people say, what do you remember most? and the music is playing, so i'll say this. dr. king said this 50 years ago, the music of the march, the harmony of the civil rights movement, the notes of dr. king's inspirational words must continue to inspire us to compose as dr. king said on that august afternoon a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. are you ready to beat the drum for that beautiful symphony of brotherhood? are you ready to realize the dream? thank you all very much. >> that was representative nancy pelosi. she has represented california's 12th district for more than 25 years. she is, of course, the first w
as highly discriminatory. what politicians decide to do about it but putting corporate america in a tough spot. an article in the new yorker this week titled "why the olympic sponsors should take action on gay rights." richard is a political strategist and gay rights advocate. bob zito is with us and he helped shape the brands of sony, new york stock exchange, bristol-myers squib. you write the participation of corporate sponsors mostly benefits the russian government. it's not required for american athletes to succeed. they sign deals before president putin signed that law. what do you think these corporate sponsors need to do now? >> i think the point is, right, that no one wants to penalize the athletes who worked so hard to succeed and most people believe we should participant. the corporate sponsors because they donate sod much money to the games, that they have earned the right to insist that russia comply with the policies that these corporations, most of these corporations have for their own employees of non-discrimination. i think that they have a lot of -- they have the power of
the nation. >> what was at stake that day? >> the future of america. >> was dr. king's dream fulfilled? the powerhouse roundtable weighs in on that and all the week's politics. it's all right here this sunday morning. >> from abc news, a special edition of "this week" with martha raddatz in cairo. and jonathan karl in washington. starts right now. >>> good morning, george is off today. we're reporting from a region on the brink, and all eyes are on syria, where an apparent chemical weapons attack could lead to american military action. here in cairo, we're just 100 miles from the mediterranean sea where u.s. warships are now at the ready. this morning, officials tell abc news that u.s. navy destroyers now in the mediterranean could be used to carry out limited military strikes. cruise missile strikes, designed to deter or prevent another chemical attack by the assad regime. if this week's suspected attack is verified. >> this is clearly a big event. of grave concern. that starts getting to some core national interest that the united states has. >> president obama has so far been unwill
was its impact on the real washington-- that is, the washington that governs the united states of america? in the lead, martin luther king, the man hailed today above all the others. >> i still have a dream. it is a dream deeply rooted in the american dream. i have a dream. >> schieffer: today, we'll talk about king's dream and the state of race relations with some prominent american american leaders, including former secretary of state colin powell, and legendary civil rights leader, georgia congressman, john lewis, who was with king that day. plus we'll hear general powell's advice to the president on the crisis in the middle east. >> in both egypt and syria, america has to take a much more-- much more clever role. >> schieffer: we'll also talk about the situation in syria with jack reed and michael mccaul. it's all ahead on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: good morning, again. tens of thousands turned out in washington yesterday to mark the 50th anniversary of the march. we'll begin today wit
america goes a long way to distinguish between radical islam and islam. >> are you making innocent americans out to be a villain right now? >> i said america goes a long way to make a distinction between radical islamist and muslims. >> are you veillainiz izizing t with this broadcast. these people are not radical islamists. these are innocent americans practicing their constitutional liberties, brother. >> i think on that day -- what what do you think? >> i haven't met a muslim that isn't offended by the exploitation of 9/11. they call this the muslim march against fear when muslims should march on ft. hood trial this week to demand for the death penalty. they should be protesting at the embassies of the saudi arabia embassy, iranian embassy and protesting all of the churches that are being burned by the muslim brotherhood and if you look at the greatest security threat to the world, it's radical muslims from within our house but you think it's appropriate to emphasize our fear in the country that gives us freedom. the march should be called how to radicalize muslims in one march.
commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of data for everyone on the plan, unlimited talk and text on smart phones. now, everyone's in the spirit of sharing. hey, can i borrow your boat this weekend? no. [ male announcer ] share more. save more. at&t mobile share for business. ♪ at&t mobile share for business. every day we're working to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s.
>>> good morning, america. this morning, inside the fire zone. we're on the front lines of the all-out battle to contain the giant wildfire raging in yosemite national park. how this fire is creatings it own weather and now jeopardizing rows of giant sequoias, the symbols of the park system. >>. ♪ when will i hide below >> a singer silenced as linda ronstadt says she has parkensons. why she can no longer sing, and why it took eight years to diagnose nose. >> cry for help, a boy hearing robbers breaking in and alls 911. >> i'm going to have to whisper because they are coming here. >> what the dispatcher told him to do next. >>> and the running of the bulls comes to america. this morning, the backlash and the thousands of adrenaline junkies in virginia who decided to go for it anyway. >> good morning, america! >> from abc news, live from new york, this is "good morning america" with dan harris and bianna golodryga. >> good morning on this very busy sunday. we want to get to the top story this morning, the wildfire raging into yosemite national park. >> morning, it's threatening hom
here tonight. and let me begin by saying that we really don't have a health care crisis in america. you hear that all of the time. we have a health care crisis. no, we don't. we have a health crisis. people from all over the world come here for health care, don't they in why? we have good health care system. what we don't have is a nation of healthy people. and the result is the costs are out of control. so what we are going to do tonight, begin to talk about what we need to do to make the positive changes. and by the way, one of the challenges from the obama care from the beginning, it is not a health care reform system. it is an insurance program. that's what it is. it is an insurance program. and i want you to think about that. making people covered. and having them is a depend thing. having car insurance would give you more a gallon. and if you had life insurance you would never do i. having insurance may only give you greater access to the doctor and the real issue is addressing the fact that we are a nation that is pretty sick. 80 percent about 80 percent of the health care costs
've heard this kind of talk before. but america is a different country. voters are rejecting 40 years of gop scare tactics. voters are supporting the obama administration's move to end severe mandatory sentences for low-level nonviolent drug offenders. of course, over at fox, they don't get it. >> they're not pot smokers. they're not pill poppers. >> wait a second. 50%. but the thing, what if the kid has a drug problem? >> then you get the kid to rehab or lock him in the basement or do what you have to do. that's what parents do. >> who thinks that one of these elderly people who have been in prison for a mandatory minimum sentence, that they're going to get out and they're not going to be on public assistance? of course they are. >> so we should keep people in prison to keep them off public aid? we should just lock up people with drug problems. this kind of demonizing and fearmongering is really nothing new for the right. it goes all the way back to president richard nixon. >> america's public enemy number one in the united states is drug abuse. in order to fight and defeat this enemy, it i
good, go, see you. two americas, a connected one and a nonconnected one. i think people are getting so rang angry about it. >> we are going to have more on that from a different angle. see if the viewers can figure it out. some celebrities are using popularity -- bob is okay. they are pushing causes that say they care about. matt damon being criticized for not practicing what he preaches when it comes to education. that discussion when "the five" comes back. ♪ (tires screeching) red hot deal days are back. (alarm beeping) stop foro one. what? it's red hot deal days. get $100 off the samsung galaxy note ii with features like pop-up play. lets you use any app while watching video. or use the s pen for hand-written notes. just $199.99. hurry in, sale ends august 11th. getting the best back to school deals. that's powerful. verizon. 'm michelle. and we own the paper cottage. it's a stationery and gifts store. anything we purchase for the paper cottage goes on our ink card. so you can manage your business expenses and access them online instantly with the game changing app from ink. we di
♪ ♪ ♪ imus in the morning ♪ >> america's middle class crushed, taxed, regulated, stuffed into part-time jobs and the numbers do not lie. good morning, everyone. here is the number. 4.4%. that's the decline, repeat, decline in median income in the obama years. averaging income down even more, and there's more on that. two big-name employers cut health care coverage because of obamacare. do you remember that promise, you could keep the coverage you like, not happening. today, the president starts a bus tour, speaking to friendly college audiences. he'll push a free ride for college students, funded in part by taxpayers. that is the theme of the show today. the middle class, struggling big time and getting more of the same from the president. "varney & company" about to begin. ♪ make it happen with the all-new fidelity active trader pro. it's one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. get 200 free trades when you start using active trader pro today. >> 11:15 eastern this morning. mark that time. president obama will make his pitch to the middle class. his b
process, but considering the breadth of america's economy and where we've been and how we have we've recovered, there's something wrong with the recovery of this recession and it's just not living up to its potential. >> well, actually, it's not as weird as you think. if you look at reinhart and the arguments from a couple of years ago, it's following the track that they said, when you have the debt-caused recessions, it's hard to get out of them. you can't afford to spend out of them. >> i see wal-mart down in earnings and macy's, cisco down on earnings and to me, it suggests a lot of problems throughout all parts of the economy. how do we turn them around? i don't know that we can afford to just bump along the way we have been. >> i'm not sure we've got an alternative. it would be good if you've got strong action from washington and fix some of our problems, that's not going to happen and get them to agree on anything. >> give me an example of some of that, quote, strong action. >> number one, we've got to do something about the long-term deficit problem in the country. we've pr
targets were in the arab world and in africa, there could also be attacks in europe or north america. now, if it is a global travel alert, then it isn't really a travel, but rather an existence alert. the public announcement had all the hallmarks of the old color-coded alerts of the bush era. threatening enough to make people anxious and vague enough to give them little to do about it. but what about al qaeda? well, al qaeda central, the organization centered in afghanistan and pakistan, is in fact battered and broke. but the idea of al qaeda remains vibrant in some other places. not, as it turns out, in the great hot beds of islamic radicalism such as saudi arabia, but rather in places where the government is so weak it simply cannot control its own territory. yemen, somalia, mali, northern nigeria. so what kind of strategy should the united states pursue against these very small groups in very weak states? there are three possible paths. the first would be a more full bore counterinsurgency strategy, the kind that general david petraeus executed in iraq and to a lesser degree in afghani
. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. [off screen] hthere you are. [speaking german] hi, grandpa! [off screen] give me a kiss! [speaking mandarin] what do you think? do you like it? [off screen] happy birthday! can you see that? [speaking polish] [off screen] did he apologize? [off screen] thanks, micah! [off screen] bye, guys. bye. see ya. oh my god! every day, more people connect face to face on the iphone than any other phone. i miss you. [ male announcer ] this summer, savor every second of vacation. but get your own cookie. enjoy a fresh-baked chocolate chip cookie at check-in and more, with rates as low as $99 per night at a doubletree. book now at doubletree.com/getaway. >>> get on the ground. do not move. get on the ground. >> it's just him. okay. it's just him. >> keep going. >> u
membership is. this is what membership does. i have a dream. >> the day that changed america forever. the march on washington. august 28th, 1963. ♪ >> people of all races, regular people from all walks of life, marching against injustice, marching to change history. >> we are the moral revolution. >> how long? we want our freedom and we want it now. >> a call to ask and a call for peace. a word that inspired a people, a nation and the entire world. >> free at least, free at least. thank god almighty we are free at least. >> tonight a special hour-hour toll particulars nation. the march on washington. the dream continues. >>> good evening. i'm al sharpton live from the lincoln memorial here on the national mall. first years ago hundreds of thousands of people stood where i am right now watching history. millions more watching at home, seeing the leaders of the civil rights movement. call for justice and equality. i talked to him from the exact spot where he can spoke 50 years ago. and we'll hear some of the young people who traveled hundreds of miles to help change the course of his
in america. that there is going to be a template by conservative elected leaders, governors, mayors, when it comes the dealing with obligations, and of course, the running they'll is, well, it is the workers' fault. this man right here go he is the first one to take the bait. that is the mayor of the richest city in america. he says that saving, saying public workers, their pensions, public workers' pensions, could put new york in the same boat as detroit? isn't that a little extreme? come on. this week new york city mayor michael bloomberg gave a speech blaming special interests politics for detroit's collapse. >> the forces that can stop the city can be internal. not just external. short sightedness, corruption, mismanage many, and perhaps most dangerous of all, special interest politics. of course, over the course of several did he go aids, we saw all of those factors at work in detroit. >> what we're seeing here is a comparison. as i said in previous programs, you are going to see mayors across the country use detroit as the example. see what they did wrong. we can't have that happen
and -- >> the constitution of the united states of america. >> undermining the rule of law. >> this is the law. this is the law of the land that was passed in a democratic process. >> what the president has done is not in this law. the president does not have -- >> what is this? >> the article 2, section 3 of the constitution says the president will faithfully implement the law, not change the deadlines for the law or pick and choose which parts of the law he executes. and that is what this president -- >> that's a big discussion. >> that is a big discussion for another -- a separate discussion for another night. >> very bad for business. thank you so much, as well, a real pleasure. >> my pleasure. >> a new study says about half the people who right now pay for their own health insurance will qualify for federal tax credits under obama care. the rest of the people will likely have to pay more than they are already. remember what mitt romney said? >> 47% of the people who vote for the president no matter what, there are 47% who are with him, who are dependent upon him, who believes they're vict
it is partners with the young invincibles for a healthy young america contest. let's listen to her explain it. >> it's a new, exciting, online video contest that we've got $30,000 in prizes that are up for grabs in a contest that showcases the law's benefits and importance of health insurance for young people. we're encouraging folks to create a song or a graphic or a video about the law's benefits, like staying on their parents plan until they are 26, not being denied coverage of a preexisting health condition. or staying healthy with free preventive services. >> let me get this straight. the administration is willing to giveaway $30,000 to try and have young people convince their peers that obama care is good for them. this is nuts. all right, joining me now, the author of, number one on amazon for over a week, "the liberty amendments," mark levin from his bunker. sir, how are you? >> i'm good, how are you, sean? >> i guess next they'll be singing songs to castro after this, mark. >> yeah, why not? i mean, we're adopting the castro agenda, aren't we? obama care is a -- not only is it a comp
in the united states of america. i'm going to to be focused on that particular issue. right now what i needed to do is to make sure schools on on time and safely. not withstand something of the personnel reductions. the focus has to be on education, young people, what goes on in school, after school, on the weekends, during the summer, and so we beefed up many of our after-school programs as well as summer programming to make sure our kids are safe and they are learning and they are working with caring, nurturing adults. >> okay. mayor landrieu, i want to get this school question out of the way as well. i want to talk about -- specifically about other things. i want to ask the same question. as new orleans is building a new prison, is this our new reality? giving up on schools to make room for teens who will inevitably end up behind bars? >> you know, it is one of the things that we face in this nation. we are bogey to have cadillac prisons and not have schools that work. we have to get priorities right. you are never getting to the issue and mayor nutter and i want to talk about tonight. whi
defined by what you lost, by what you can't do. you've inspired america with what you can do. maybe you lost your sight but you can still see the truth that our disabled veterans make extraordinary contributions to our country every single day. maybe you lost an arm but you still have the strength to pick up a friend or neighbor in need. maybe you lost a leg but you still stand tall for the values and freedoms that make america the greatest nation on earth. [ applause ] i think of the wounded warrior who spoke for so many of you when he said your life will never be the same but that doesn't mean you can't go on to do amaze things with the second thing you've given. i think of wounded veterans across america and how they used that second chance. volunteering in communities. building home, being a mentor to local kids, showing up after tornadoes, after hurricane sandy to help folks rebuild. i think of the wounded warriors who reached out to the survivors of the boston marathon bombing with a simple message, we stand with you. i think of all the inspiring wounded warriors that michelle and
states of america. oh, really, watch this. >> we recognize that change takes time. and that a process like this is never guaranteed. there are examples in recent history of countries that are transitioned out of a military government towards a democratic government and did not always go in a straight line and the process was not always smooth. there are going to be false starts. there will be difficult days. america's democratic journey took us through mighty struggles to perfect our union. >> a few short moments after makes those quite ignorant remarks, guess where the commander in chief was spotted. after that, he was playing golf on the golf course. which leaves me with one simple question. is he really that out of touch or does he simply not care? here to help answer the question, patrick j. buchanan, fox news analyst, juan williams. patrick j. buchanan, precipitated this. now he was lecturing the military which is getting rid of the radical islamist. is this the foreign policy that america needs? >> i think the things are out of control in cairo as far as the president is concern
in pregnancy are very low. >> how did america get so mediocre? >> i think parents- both parents started working. and the mom is in the workplace. >> for everyone who is a valedictorian, there is another 100 out there that they weigh 130 pounds and they've got cavs the size of cantaloupes because they're hauling 75 pounds of marijuana across the desert. >> i have no idea. >> even at this point? >> well, i don't know. was there a birth certificate? you tell me. some people tell me that was not his birth certificate. i'm saying i don't know. >> so with all of this autopsy, joy, with all of this, we need to reach out, expand the tent. we need to really make a new party. these are the kind of things that they have representing their party. to the core, they can't change it. >> exactly. and what you just showed there, that was the core demographic of the republican party now. it is a generation of almost entirely men, almost entirely white there are women in it as well, who come from a generation where they resent the changes that took place in the 20th century. they resent things like bussing. they
america. >> remember back in 2009 the u.s. unilaterally broke our security agreement at the behest of russia? what has that gotten us? >> i remember the headlines, that said "betrayed". the poland and czechs learned that if we stand up with the united states we are not going to stand with them. we aren't strong, we around bold. when you negotiate with the former kgb, you want to be the dominant personality, those two things are very important. it is going to be hard to talk about letting snowden into the united states. putin looks into the eyes of barack obama. if there was a strong personality there, and someone who was willing to put out a strategy, he would react to that. i see the hand that he is playing. >> senator, isn't it em bar rasing to see him suck up to him the way that he has? >> i think so. >> i think it is. >> senator? >> once he started his administration on the apology tour. he is looking for the love of the world when we need respect. we need to show that we are the world's leader. then russia would start respecting us. we need to start encouraging nato expansion.
guess, in america who knows exactly how brett, hanna's father has been feeling in the last week. obviously, a very happy ending to this, as indeed, it was in your case, but tell me how you feel about what he's going through and what add voice you would give them as a family going forward? >> well, you know, you're on this roller coaster certainly with the death of his wife and son that had to be, i would almost say catastrophic, and then to not know whether your daughter was still alive or not for a period of time, you know, we had that roller coaster effect emotionally that, you know, we would hear that a body had been found or a burned body or bones or, you know, any type of scenario out there, and certainly, that that puts you on an emotional roller coaster to get the word that your child is still alive is, you know, there is no other word than miracle that comes to mind, and certainly, a wonderful day in the midst on a total night mare. we haven't heard how dimaggio may have manipulated her. fortunately, you know, he's no longer around for her sake, and i'm hoping that with
talking about the gun violence in america. something my next guest knows a lot about, perhaps more than most. new york police commissioner ray kelly who joins me. commissioner kelly, welcome to you and congratulations first of all in the largest gun bust in new york's history. 254 illegal guns that you seized this week. i want to come to that later. we'll start with the two appalling gun incidents in america. first this young australian student, here to play baseball, who was targeted by randomly bored teenagers and gunned down to hi death. what's your reaction to that story? >> it is horrific. no question about it. it underscores the fact there's way too many guns abroad in america. we have as many as 300 million guns in this country. just an incredible number. unfortunately, you are going to see events like this take place when you have that number of weapons. we think that we're in need of sensible gun laws, federal laws. the case that you mentioned in new york and we're going to talk about it, but it cries out for federal gun trafficking laws. we simply don't have that. it also cri
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 797 (some duplicates have been removed)